Friday, 27 March 2020

Coronavirus and friends

Been saying for long enough that if we don't stop destroying nature then mother nature will have us, most likely with a virus.

Well coronavirus is just a gentle warning folks. The next one could be 50-60-70+ % deadly and then its game over for civilization.

We are one Far Eastern live animal market away from complete Armaggedon.

We should act as a global voice to stop the animal markets. It'd be cheaper to send thousands of tons of beef to pooer people in the far east and Africa to eat for free.

Seriously - if we don't stamp bushmeat out completely we are fucked.

Wednesday, 18 March 2020

Rare white giraffes killed in Kenya

A rare white giraffe and her calf were killed by poachers near a Kenyan wildlife sanctuary, conservationists said earlier this month

The bodies of the two giraffes were found "in a skeletal state after being killed by armed poachers" in Garissa in eastern Kenya, the Ishaqbini Hirola Community Conservancy said in a statement.

White giraffes are very rare; only a few have been sighted in Kenya. They are not albinos, but instead have a condition called leucism, which means an animal's skin does not contain pigment-producing cells.

Thursday, 13 February 2020

Game numbers up and down in Selous-Mikumi

Tanzania recorded a slight increase of elephants and a considerable surge in zebra and hippopotamus populations in the Selous-Mikumi ecosystem between 2014 and 2018, a new report shows.

The report of the aerial wildlife census that was conducted between October and November 2018 covering 27 wildlife species indicates that elephants have increased by 284, zebra 6,190 while number of hippopotamus rose by 7,843.

It covered a total area of 104,143 km² that embrace Mikumi National Park, Selous Game Reserve, Kilombero Game Controlled Area and Selous-Niassa wildlife corridor.

Current statistics from the report have it that, the surveyed area has 15,501 elephants, up from 15,217 that were recorded in the previous study conducted in 2014.

This means that there is no further decline in the elephant population in the Selous-Mikumi ecosystem, and that the stabilising of the number of elephants combined with few incidences of fresh carcasses indicates that poaching has been brought under control.

Wildebeeste numbers, however have fallen by 72 percent over the last 22 years, and 'lesser' antelope by a whopping 97% in the same period. The very high carcass ratios suggest a lot of bushmeant hunting is taking place. However the carcass ratio has dropped significantly by the time this last survey was conducted.